Minnesota State SE student: “I feel like a car is just a big puzzle’ | Local News

Taryn Reichow graduated from Winona State University last spring with a major in legal studies and a minor in Spanish. So how did she end up in the automotive technology program at Minnesota State College Southeast this year?

“Auto mechanics has been on my mind since high school. Everyone is surprised because it’s something that I never shared with anyone,” said Taryn.

Taryn grew up in Glencoe, a small town west of the Twin Cities. While in high school, she took enough college-level classes to cover most of the general education requirements. That meant when she started at WSU, she was already a year ahead, so she was able to graduate in only three years.

She had always been fascinated by automobiles, especially the restoration of classic cars. “My grandpa had a vintage Dodge truck that he completely restored when he was first married,” she said. “My grandmother used to tell me how he would have the entire engine in pieces laid out on the living room floor!”

In high school, Taryn didn’t know how to find resources to learn about fixing cars since her school didn’t have any automotive shop classes. After finishing her senior capstone as an intern in a law office and graduating from the university, she was curious about options and searched online for automotive tech programs.

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When she learned that there was a great program close by in Winona, she made up her mind to take a fourth year of college to pursue her long-held interest.

The Automotive and Light Duty Diesel Technology diploma at Minnesota State College Southeast is an intensive undertaking. Students attend for two semesters and one summer session to complete 24 theory and lab courses. Taryn will graduate in August with a 54-credit diploma.

She was excited about the opportunity to study in a program led by Amanda Evenson. As a female student in a predominantly male field, she has found a welcoming environment at MSC Southeast.

“For me it really made a difference having a female teacher,” Taryn said. “I have never felt different in Amanda’s classes. I fit right in with my classmates. Nobody ever feels ‘less than.’ We’re all just students. Some of us have had experience working on cars, some have not.”

Taryn said that she loves working on cars because she likes solving puzzles. “Last semester we started with the basics — brakes, suspension, steering. This semester we’re digging into the big systems and parts, pulling out engines, working on drive trains. I feel like a car is just a big puzzle — I love a challenge.”

Taryn isn’t sure whether she’ll pursue a career in automotive and light duty diesel mechanics after she graduates. In fact, right now she’s looking into law school applications. But wherever her future may take her, she’s confident that she’ll be comfortable working with cars and maintaining her own.

Her grandpa’s Dodge truck is still in storage in a barn out on the family farm. “Maybe

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Athens Technical University university student and car to appear on Historical past Channel

It was a laborious process for Athens Complex Faculty student Thomas Dickerson to tote his “homework” — a 1967 Ford Shelby GTO 350 Mustang — to and from campus, but the really hard operate of totally rebuilding the automobile has paid out off.

Dickerson will look on an episode of “2021 SEMA Battle of the Builders” on the Heritage Channel at 9 a.m. Sunday.

He is just one of the three recipients who gained a Young Guns Golden ticket with all expenditures paid to take part in the Specialty Gear Suppliers Affiliation level of competition in Las Vegas in November. 

Dickerson was awarded Best 10 in the Younger Guns (builders below the age of 27) and Top rated 40 general for his do the job. It also caught the eye of the Television display producers who interviewed him about his encounter as just one of the youngest to enter the levels of competition at age 21.

“I started off with a stock 1967 Mustang Fastback and experienced to cautiously craft pieces to switch it into a Shelby (Tribute),” said Dickerson. “I built my Mustang with quite a few modern-day factors, taking it all the way to the issue exactly where you can travel a brand-new Mustang and not sense a variance between it and my auto. In some situations, it will generate much better and conduct exceptionally improved, also.

“All of this took an enormous amount of engineering and tailor made fabrication to make it conduct the way I had intended. I had to make lots of of the sections because they simply just did not exist or perform with my technical specs.”

The venture took Dickerson about a few decades to full.

“This was the first car or truck I at any time painted. It took more than 26 hours to paint about two times, and I expended two to a few weeks soaked sanding it afterward,” Dickerson claimed. “I designed my very own heart console using classes listed here that we have — mechanical engineering technology — and I developed my entire console on SolidWorks.”

The car or truck is outfitted with fuel injection, LED headlights, electric cooling, digital analog gauges, a 7-inch touchscreen radio, press-button begin and a critical fob. Seats from a 2017 Mustang had been utilized as perfectly as personalized upholstery built to his hand-drawn style.

“Seventy p.c of the car is brand name new, and every panel on the exterior of the car or truck is 100 p.c new. When I acquired the auto, I was interested in mechanical engineering but it was not as palms-on as I had imagined, so that is when I enrolled in the automotive collision repair service software at Athens Tech,” he mentioned.

“Thomas was a great university student and labored incredibly difficult to master the competencies necessary to develop the dream he experienced envisioned,” explained Greg Thomas, application chair for automotive collision repair at Tech. “With his skills and difficult get the job done, he was capable to

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Caldwell student wants career in automotive tech | News

There was a time when some jobs would be considered to be “men’s” jobs and others would be deemed “women’s” jobs, but these days, it’s not about who’s doing the job, but how well they do it.

Shaye Goddard is one of several girls in classes at the Caldwell Regional Career Center, and her work and interest in automotive technology have led her to being this week’s Associated General Contractors of Western Kentucky Technical Center Student of the Week.

Goddard — a sophomore at Caldwell County High School — is in her first year in the automotive technology program at the CRCC.

“I’ve always helped my uncle and my grandpa work on old trucks and tractors,” she said, talking about Joe Don Doom and Don Doom, respectively, adding that working on vehicles was a hobby instead of a vocation. “It was just something that had always interested me, so I figured I’d take that in high school and make it into a job.”

Goddard said she is learning about hydraulic lifts and four-post lifts in class right now.

“I really like all the different mechanical things that I can learn about,” she said. “(When I was younger,) I was really into these little train things, and I was always building train tracks with them. I’m a visual learner, so everything that I do is mostly hands-on.”

Alan Shaffer is Goddard’s instructor in the auto tech program, and he said Goddard is working in maintenance and light repair work thus far.

“She hit the ground running,” he said. “Right now, she’s working on engine maintenance, and she’s finishing up some of her safety instruction.”

Shaffer said Goddard is one of several girls in the maintenance and light repair class, which has four sections.

“All of my first-year students are in there,” he said. “I think there’s five or six girls in that class. I have had girls in a class from time to time, but I’ve never had that many at one time.”

Shaffer said Goddard has been a solid student in his class.

“She doesn’t shy away from anything,” he said. “If they were all like her, I’d be tickled to death.”

Shaffer said careers that students in automotive technology can aspire to include major repair work and auto service and maintenance.

Goddard said even though graduation is two years away, automotive technology is something she could see herself doing after graduation.

“I would love, after I graduate from here, to go to Nashville Auto and Diesel College,” she said. “I’d like to open my own shop and make it a career.”

In her spare time, Goddard helps her guardians on their farm and enjoys being with their animals, which include donkeys, alpacas and dogs. She also plays guitar and saxophone and enjoys reading.

She is a member of FFA at Caldwell County High School.

Goddard is the ward of Joe Don and Erica Doom of Fredonia.

A story featuring the AGC of Western Kentucky Technical Center Student of the

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