A fun fat-tire electric utility bike

The Himiway Big Dog is a new “cargo” bike from Himiway, a popular electric bike brand that has expanded its product line considerably over the last year. While I’m not sure this bike qualifies as a true cargo bike by most definitions, it’s definitely a fun little utility e-bike that cruises more like a mini-moped.

Himiway Big Dog tech specs

  • Motor: 750W 86Nm rear hub motor
  • Top speed: 40 km/h (25 mph) after unlocking
  • Range: Claimed up to 130 km (80 mi)
  • Battery: 48 V 20 Ah (960 Wh)
  • Weight: 36 kg (79 lb)
  • Max load: 181 kg (400 lb)
  • Frame: 6061 aluminum
  • Suspension: Front suspension fork
  • Brakes: Hydraulic disc brakes on 180 mm rotors
  • Tires: 20″ x 4″ Kenda fat tires
  • Extras: LCD display with speedometer, wattmeter, battery gauge, PAS level indicator, odometer, tripmeter, front and rear LED lights, half-twist throttle, includes rear rack (wooden) and front/rear fenders, center kick stand, front of bike has mount for optional rack
  • Price: $1,999 (or $200 off with code BF200 for Black Friday) or $1,799 on Amazon

Himiway Big Dog video review

My wife and I had a blast testing out a pair of Himiway Big Dogs on a recent trip to Vermont, where we soaked up the fall weather and enjoyed cruising on powerful electric two-wheelers.

Check out our experience in the video below:

Fun, powerful, and comfortable too!

We only had the bikes for a couple days, so I wasn’t able to do as in-depth testing as I normally do, but even in just a few days we still got to really enjoy these e-bikes and get a sense of what they’re made of. And while these aren’t high-end e-bikes like fancy $4,000 electric cargo bike options, there’s a lot to like.

Sure, there are pros and cons to the Himiway Big Dog just like most e-bikes. But there are enough of the former to outweigh the latter in most cases.

Let’s get those downsides out of the way first. The bike is quite heavy, weighing in at a hefty 79 pounds (36 kg). And it’s not just they’re heavy — the bike is also bulky. I only had to carry the two Himiway Big Dogs up three or four steps each day, but it was a doozy. The bikes are fairly long and the big hub motor puts that weight quite rearward. It’s doable, but it’s not at all like picking up a smaller e-bike.

himiway big dog e-bike

Next, the pedal assist is quite surge-y. I’m not sure if that’s the best word to describe it, but it really comes on with quite a surge of power.

In fact, that’s why I consider these to be more of a moped-style e-bike. With that hand throttle at the ready and plenty of power on tap, it’s hard to fight the temptation to ride them like a moped where the pedals are largely for resting your feet.

If you do want to pedal, you certainly can. But

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HOVSCO HovBeta 20″ Foldable Fat Tire electric bike review – a truly excellent foldable ebike

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REVIEW – I’ve been riding electric motorcycles and more recently ebikes for almost a decade now. I love electric bikes, especially as a way to get around town quickly and efficiently while still offering the opportunity to get a good workout when I want. We’ve been looking for a while to get a good second ebike for my partner so we can ride together, and the HOVSCO HovBeta 20″ Foldable Fat Tire electric bike looked like the perfect one for her. Even if HOVSCO hadn’t been sending me one to review, if I’d heard about them I’d have likely selected this one to meet our needs after researching the different models on the market today. Many of the more portable folding bikes look like clown bikes to me, with tiny wheels and usually no front or rear shocks, which look like they’d be rather painful on anything but perfectly smooth terrain. In the suburban jungle we usually ride around, larger tires and some shock absorption are necessary.

What is it?

The HOVSCO HovBeta 20″ Foldable Fat Tire electric bike is an electric bike with a step-through frame form factor, with fat tire wheels. This particular ebike allows you to ride with no electric motor assistance, or with a throttle pushed down and no pedaling, or with “pedal assist” where the motor combines with the rider’s efforts to propel the bike forward. You can either treat this like a scooter/moped style vehicle and just throttle all over town, or you can treat it like a regular bicycle and get to places faster with less (or no) sweat.

What’s in the box?

  • HOVSCO HovBeta 20″ Foldable Fat Tire electric bike
  • AC wall charger
  • Installation tool kit
  • 2 year warranty on the frame, motor, and battery, 30-90 days on other parts.

Hardware specs

  • 750 W (1032 W peak), 85 Nm. torque SUTTO (sub branch of Bafang) motor
  • 720 Wh, 48 V, 15 Ah Samsung/LG Lithium-ion battery with built in light
  • Up to 60 Miles range, 4 hours charge from empty
  • Suggested rider height: 4’11” to 6’3″
  • Max weight: 450 Lbs
  • Max hill climb assist: 40 degrees
  • Torque Sensor pedal assist
  • Class 1 ebike out of the box, Class 2/3 unlocked via smartphone app
  • Max speed throttle-only: 20 mph
  • Max speed pedal-assist: 28 mph
  • LCD digital display
  • Frame: 6061 Aluminum alloy with internal battery
  • Weight: 66.4 lbs
  • Dimensions Unfolded (with handlebars in lowest position): 66.92″ long x 48.82″ tall x 24.61″
  • Dimensions Folded:

Design and features

For a relatively new bike company (founded in 2019, headquartered in Ontario CA), HOVSCO has put out a bike that feels on par or better than bikes I’ve ridden or owned from market leaders like Rad Power. I couldn’t find any fit or finish flaws worth writing about, and while I’m not an expert on every bike component out there I’ve ridden

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EV riders: bike suppliers building the leap to electrical | Automotive market

The bike market has complications: its petrolhead riders are ageing, customer quantities are shrinking and bans on fossil-fuel energy are looming.

Startup bicycle-maker Maeving thinks batteries are the solution to all a few. Its RM1 motorbike swaps a noisy petrol motor for a close to-silent electric powered motor and thoroughly clean retro styling. Throughout a take a look at experience at the company’s factory in close proximity to Coventry – by the Observer’s photographer – the knowledge is sleek, agile and gearless.

“Eco-mindful millennials” are a important market for the organization. “Motorcycling has a large trouble with bringing in new riders,” claims Will Stirrup, just one of Maeving’s co-founders. “The holy grail for motorcycle suppliers is bringing in young buyers.”

The motor vehicle marketplace is currently achieving a tipping place in the shift to batteries, but for motorbikes the challenge is trickier: it is far more hard to cram more than enough electrical energy into their modest frames.

Having said that, a rising number of companies are seeking their luck. Harley-Davidson, the biggest US motorbike producer, is offering the £29,000 LiveWire, with a 146-mile city using vary, and California-based Zero’s SR/S design begins at £20,100 for a 161-mile city selection. At the other end of the scale is a host of Chinese makers these as Tremendous Soco, whose TSX begins at £2,900 for a 40-mile selection. An additional British startup, Arc, will produce the 1st of its £90,000 Vector sports activities bikes in November.

Historic British marques are also striving to catch up: Norton claimed in June it was creating an electric device Triumph is at the prototype phase and BSA, purchased by Indian billionaire Anand Mahindra, programs to provide a person out soon.

But there is a burgeoning – probably bewildering – array of smaller possibilities. Electrically assisted bicycles are presently vying with electrical force scooters (which are gradually on their way to legalisation in the Uk) and electric powered mopeds.

Stirrup and co-founder Seb Inglis-Jones, 29 and 31 respectively, remaining occupations in finance and advertising and marketing to identified Maeving. They persuaded Graeme Gilbert, formerly head of solution at Triumph, to direct on the style and design of the bicycle with the hope of finding forward of founded makes.

“The sluggishness of the major gamers did give us the possibility,” says Stirrup, standing in the tiny manufacturing facility in which bikes are currently being assembled by hand. The team of 25 has shipped 100 equipment so significantly, and they are hoping to deliver 2,500 bikes a 12 months – if they can get the funding.

The RM1’s removable batteries: swappable electrical power cells could current a remedy to the time spent waiting around for electric powered motorbikes to demand. Photograph: Fabio De Paola/The Guardian

Two 40-mile-array batteries, made by Samsung, can be charged at house and then slotted into compartments in the RM1 (which commences at £4,495 for a one-battery version). These electric power an in-wheel motor produced by German automotive elements huge Bosch. The bicycle is restricted

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Hummingbird Folding Electric Flax Bike Review

A typical e-bike is heavy: somewhere in the region of 30lb-55lb (15kg-25kg). It’s understandable given you have to integrate a motor and battery to create the best electric bikes, but the weight makes it difficult to manoeuvre when you’re out of the saddle. It’s more of a problem for a folding e-bike when portability is even more important. The best folding bikes tend to come at a premium price because the folding mechanism is harder to design and manufacture than a standard frame, but in return you should be able to carry it around shops and on public transport easily, and into your home to store.

After reviewing six folding e-bikes, I’ve tended to favour the ones that can be wheeled because that bypasses the weight issue. Hummingbird, however, solves it by being lighter than any others – including many electric road bikes – at a weight of 22.7lb (10.3kg).

Hummingbird manufactures exceptionally light bikes to begin with. The brand’s electric bikes also use an all-in-one battery and rear wheel-mounted motor from Zehus. At 7lb (3.2kg), the whole kit is only marginally heavier than the Brompton Electric’s 6.4lb (2.9kg) battery.

Hummingbird even offers a more sustainable Flax range of folding bikes and e-bikes, with the frame made from flax plant fibres. The material has been developed by motorsports engineering company Prodrive, which is also behind Hummingbird, and it is supposed to have remarkably similar properties to carbon fibre. There’s a carbon-fibre Hummingbird of an identical weight and price to the Flax version.

It’s all very impressive, but also very expensive, as innovative things often are.

Hummingbird Folding Electric Flax Bike, detail of flax frame

The frame of the Hummingbird is made from plant fibres. (Image credit: Jonathan Shannon / Future)

Hummingbird Folding Electric Flax: Price And Availability

The Electric Flax bike is available from Hummingbird (opens in new tab) for £4,995 and delivery times are currently two to four weeks. The bike is available to buy using Splitit, a 0% interest credit service that divides payment into three instalments. If you don’t reside in the UK you can buy it for £4,162.50 – the price with VAT at 20% knocked off. 

The full price is £500 more than Hummingbird’s entry-level folding electric bike, which weighs the same and has the same features. It’s also the most expensive folding e-bike I’ve tried. It’s closest competitors are the Brompton Electric P Line ($4,700-$4,810/£3,695-£3,775, 34.4lb/15.6 kg) and Gocycle G4 (£3,299, 17.6kg/38.8 lbs), but you can also find usable options for much less like the the Furo X ($2,399/£1,799, 33lb/15kg).

How I Tested This Bike

I had the Hummingbird for a week and used it for a trip to a supermarket, to drop off a parcel and two cycle commutes for a total of around 37 miles (59km). Unfortunately, I was directed to use an outdated version of the app, but I did squeeze in a 3km ride to test the remote control and regenerative braking feature.

The Fold

Hummingbird Folding Electric Flax Bike folded in carry case

The folded Hummingbird in its carry case (Image credit: Jonathan Shannon / Future)

Folding

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Pivot’s Shuttle LT First Ride Review: This E-Enduro Bike has the Handling of a Firebird 29

There are plenty of good enduro-style e-mountain bikes on the market. This one is great. 

Pivot’s Shuttle LT pedal assist e-bike showcases Shimano’s EP8 system, the only drive unit claimed to be specifically designed for mountain bikes. It uses a removable, 756-watt, Shimano-certified battery, 160 Float X/170 E-MTB 38 29″, 44mm offset, GRIP2 Fox suspension, and the geometry and the kinematics of Pivot’s Firebird 29. 

The Ride

All riding photos c. Pivot

I hopped on this bike at the top of Monarch Pass – around 11,000 feet in altitude–the morning after arriving in Colorado from sea level. I pedaled out of the lot and up the double track with the support of this bike’s full boost power behind me. When I turned off onto the first stretch of rooty and rocky singletrack, I bumped the power down a notch to Trail, and had more than enough support and all the maneuverability I needed. The bike absorbed the chunder and steered with precision letting me pick my line around chunky rocks, and charged through steep switchbacks with powerful control. 

Pivot Shuttle LT ebike first ride review

To smash or to finesse–that is always the question for me when I ride e-bikes on technical trails. The Shuttle LT let me do both. The bike was lively, playful and it pedaled efficiently without the heavy feeling of most other enduro e-bikes whether I was pounding through rock gardens or trying to carve through them. It was nimble in technical terrain.

Pivot Shuttle LT ebike first ride review

Blasting through a crash pad of rocks and roots descending Green Creek off Monarch Crest, baby head boulders, and steep sections of slippery dirt, the bike went where I pointed it, sailing smoothly. The ride wasn’t so plush it got boring, and the harder I pushed the bike the better it rode. Pivot’s DW link felt balanced. I never needed to lock the shock to climb, and the bike didn’t squat under power. Shimano 160mm cranks kept me from rock-striking–which is even more important on an ebike. I could power through the chunder thanks to the bike’s low center of gravity and short cranks. I felt settled in on the bike, in control of the ride, and despite the shorter cranks, I never felt like I lacked torque. 

What’s Inside

Pivot Shuttle LT ebike first ride review

At 49.8 pounds, the bike is competitive in weight with others on the market. But it rides light. Part of it might be psychological. The Shuttle LT has a trim downtube that was made possible by a 726-watt, Shimano-certified battery. Pivot didn’t like the shape of existing batteries so it worked with Darfan to develop one using the same cells found in a Tesla. The slimmer tube takes ebikes one more step towards looking like a traditional bike. While the battery isn’t proprietary, Pivot is the first to use it– and Shimano will handle any warranty claims worldwide. 

 

Shimano’s EP8 drive unit provides the assist. Power delivery was smooth and seamless, without any jerky engagement or disengagement. In the Shuttle LT, it also allows for battery placement lower in the

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Stashers Modular Insulated Hike & Bike Adventure Bags review – EDC-C? (Every Day Cold Carry?)

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REVIEW – Headed over to a friend’s house and want to bring a few cold drinks along? Oh, you’re thinking of riding your bicycle there or maybe even walking? That takes the typical cooler out of play. What if I told you that there’s a solution that’s bike and/or hike-friendly and doesn’t take up much more space than the drinks you’re bringing? Stashers Adventure Bags to the rescue.

What are they?

Stashers are insulated adventure bags specifically designed to attach to bikes, roll bars without needing additional hardware. Designed for beverages like cans, tall boys, and even wine bottles, they’ll also handle whatever you can fit inside getting it there cold, protected, or both. I was sent the Green color. They’re also available in Black, Orange, Floral, Realtree edge camo, and Laughing Grass camo.

What’s in the package?

Each model consists of…

  • Stashers Adventure Bag
  • Food-grade zippered liner
  • Reusable cold pack

The Plus Sized version additionally has 2 re-positionable dividers as well as zippered pockets on each end.

A carry strap is available separately and includes a shoulder pad.

Hardware specs

Materials: Waterproof Tarpaulin with waterproof zippers and velcro
Dimensions: Diameter x Length – Medium 3.5″ x 15″ | Large 3.5″ x 20″ | Plus Sized 5″ x 12″
Construction: Multiple layers of padding and insulation keep things cold for 4 plus hours
Modular: Velcro straps allow connecting to each other

Design and features

Each Stashers Adventure Bag is designed with waterproof materials making condensation and spills non-issues. The modular attachment design allows them to be wrapped onto bicycle tubes, handlebars, car roll bars or to each other. Additionally, the zippered closure is also waterproof and offset by 90 degrees so that it can be accessed without needing to detach a bag first.

The thick padding and insulation help to keep drinks cold for over 4 hours. Removable food-grade liners can be used for loose snacks, or to further keep moisture at bay with their waterproof zipper keeping any messes much easier to clean up.

A shoulder strap makes going from bike to hike super simple.

Setup

Remove from the poly bag packaging, throw the included cold packs in the freezer and then figure out how and where you want to use your Stashers Adventure Bag. Let’s jump right into how these work using the Plus Size to demonstrate.

Stashers Adventure Bags are designed with straps that wrap around a tube and then velcro back to the bag in a way that allows for different tube sizes and excess strap management. The trickiest part of installing a bag is that those same straps are curved and like to stay closed, so un-velcro the two straps and just be ready to keep un-velcro-ing.

Wrap the straps around the handlebar or top tube and back to the two velcro patches shown above.

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