Cannondale Topstone Alloy 2 review – Gravel Bikes – Bikes

While the carbon fibre Topstone is well established in the gravel world, Cannondale’s latest alloy machine, the Topstone Alloy, brings the brand’s gravel bike platform to more affordable price points.

Here, the Topstone 2 is a mid-range offering at £1,800, which sits alongside a budget Microshift 10-speed option at £1,200 and top-tier alloy build at £2,400.

Having been launched earlier this month, the new Topstone Alloy is bang up-to-date, with plenty of mounting points for bags, mudguards and a rack, clearance for 45mm tyres and dropped seatstays.

In this guise, with a 2x drivetrain and 37mm tyres, it’s an excellent choice for riders who want a versatile gravel bike for all kinds of riding, though you’ll want to make better use of the clearance for more technical trails.

Cannondale Topstone Alloy 2 frame details

There’s (officially) clearance for tyres up to 45mm.
Russell Burton / Our Media

Cannondale’s ‘SmartForm C2’ alloy is used for the Topstone frame, with smoothed welds giving an appealing finish.

The seatstays have been dropped since the previous year’s model, giving a more curved shape towards the rear axle, though they still feature full rear rack mounts. There are full mudguard mounts at the rear, too.

In an additional nod to versatility, there’s also internal routing for a dropper post, should you wish to add one later.

Unlike some Topstone bikes of old, the new Topstone Alloy has a traditional wheel dish – matching the new Topstone Carbon – and, continuing the themes of simplicity and compatibility, there’s a threaded BSA bottom bracket. Cannondale says the new bike is also compatible with gravel suspension forks, including its own Lefty Oliver.

Geometry is fairly conservative for a modern gravel bike.
Russell Burton / Our Media

As standard, a rigid, full-carbon fork is used, with bikepacking cage mounts both on the fork blades and, as mentioned, mounts for easy mudguard attachment.

Unlike some of the best gravel bikes, the Topstone Alloy is compatible with a double-chainring setup, using a band-on front derailleur.

In fact, aside from the most affordable model – the Topstone Alloy 4, with its 10-speed Microshift Advent X 1x drivetrain – Cannondale only specs 2x drivetrains across the aluminium range.

For 2022, the frames are available in this ‘Midnight’ colourway – a deep shimmering blue/black – or olive green, both with a matt black fork.

Cannondale Topstone Alloy 2 geometry and sizing

Cannondale employs its OutFront steering approach on the Alloy 2.
Russell Burton / Our Media

Cannondale has applied its ‘OutFront’ steering philosophy, borrowed from the brand’s carbon Topstone gravel bikes. This sees a long fork offset paired with a slightly slacker head angle to keep the steering, Cannondale claims, confident but lively.

All things considered, the Topstone Alloy’s geometry is fairly middle-of-the-road as far as the latest gravel bikes are concerned, matching its ambitions as a safe bet for a variety of riding, whether that be fitting mudguards for winter road riding and commuting, or adding a bit more off-road capability through wider

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RENPHO AI Smart Exercise Bike review – All sorts of training, in your living room! (as long as you’re under 6’ tall)

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REVIEW – When the pandemic drove everyone out of the gyms and into their houses, in-home fitness systems like Peloton took off. Everyone seemed to have one, which might explain why, for a while, they were so hard to get. And they were expensive.  Peloton bikes are nice, but they are really just a stationary bike that reports key metrics like power (how much energy you produce, watts) and cadence (how fast you pedal, in rpm).  Could you recreate that same basic experience with a non-peloton bike that reported those features?  And could that bike do other cool stuff like adjust the resistance on its own?  The answer is yes, with a few caveats. Let’s check out the RENPHO AI Smart exercise bike.

What is it?

The RENPHO AI Smart exercise bike is a smart stationary bike and app ecosystem that uses AI to customize workouts to your fitness and ability.  It also works with other apps like Peloton, Zwift, and Trainer Road.  

What’s in the box?

  • RENPHO AI Smart exercise bike
  • Parts and tools to put the bike together (don’t worry – it’s not hard)
  • AC adapter
  • Manual
  • Quick-start guide

Hardware specs

  • Smart Technology: RENPHO AI Gym App – iOS and Android
  • Third-party app connectivity: FTMS Bluetooth
  • Third-party app control: Kinoma, Zwif, FulGas, Rouvy, XERT, Wahoo Systm (yes, it’s spelled that way)
  • Resistance type: Smart Motor Damping
  • Resistance functionality: Automatic and manual resistance
  • Power Accuracy: ≥90%
  • Power range: 0-1000W(Peak)
  • Gears: 80 (the bike does not have actual gears – this is simulated)
  • Metrics: Real-time RPM, Power, Cadence, Resistance, Calories
  • Wireless firmware updates: Yes
  • Frame: Carbon structural steel
  • Size: 49 inch(Height) x 20 inch(Width) x 40 inch(Length)、
  • Seat: Universal Seat Cushion Standard Dual-Rail Mounting and airflow system 8 inch(Width) x 10.5 inch(Length)
  • Pedals: Adjustable Pedal Straps
  • Tablet Holder: Up to 8.46 inch
  • Adjustability: Handlebar: range 32.5 inch – 41.3 inch Saddle fore/aft : range 0 – 3inch Saddle height: range 32.5 – 41.3 inch
  • Crank Length: 6.7 inch
  • Q factor: 6.3 inch
  • Calibration: Factory Set
  • Power required: 120V household power
  • Operating Temperature: 41-122°F
  • User Requirements: Height range: 4′11″ – 6′0″  (official specs say 6’5’’, but this is impossible)
  • Weight maximum: 265 lbs

Assembly

The hardest part of the RENPHO AI Smart exercise bike assembly is just getting the bike out of the box.  It’s very well packaged and protected, but it’s a heavy box to move around.  Having a buddy helps.  

Once you get the box to where you want, you really just flip it upside down, cut around the bottom, and lift the box off.  Then you pull the packaging away, separate the parts, and follow the simple instructions using the tools provided.  All told, it took me about 30 minutes from unboxing to riding.  The included tools are adequate for the build (just two hex wrenches, and an open end wrench for

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Watson Motorcycle Gloves Assessment [O10R Extreme and O25 Overtime]

We have experienced the prospect to look at some excellent goods from Canada, the most new remaining the eWool Professional+ heated vest. Here’s a search at some extra choices from Canada, this time in the line of hand protection. Watson Gloves, with a US foundation in Midlothian, Virg., features a range of 53 versions of motorbike gloves. That includes every thing from conventional deerskin leather-based, with and without Thinsulate lining, to some superior-tech goods designed to satisfy ANSI/ISEA security efficiency criteria.We checked out the O10R Serious and 025 Extra time motorcycle gloves.Watson Gloves 010R Serious The 010R Extreme fashion is in all probability a very good alternative when driving in awesome conditions, as the base content is extend Spandex on the back and major-responsibility microfiber fabric on the palm. As a consequence, the Excessive has confined airflow to the hand.

Watson Motorcycle Gloves: O10R Extreme
The Watson Severe is not insulated, but will work nicely in great to chilly climate.

The touchscreen purpose operates perfectly on the fingertips, and the neoprene wrist cuff with Velcro strap closure can make for a safe retention system. A loop tab is presented on the wrist cuff, earning it less complicated to pull the gloves on.D3O affect safety padding on the palm is arrayed in two parts—one right beneath the knuckles, the other at the heel of the palm. Even though this padding works great for taming the “awful waffle” grips on my vintage Hondas, it also increases the helpful grip sizing. That might affect consolation for some riders, notably on motorcycles with a 1-inch diameter handlebar, even though it didn’t trouble me.

Watson Motorcycle Gloves: O10R Extreme gloves
The Watson Excessive 010R motorcycle gloves contain D3O influence defense on the palm.

D3O is a “smart” materials that is supple in standard use in its uncooked state. On the other hand, when a shock load is applied, the materials locks alongside one another to soak up and disperse energy, and then promptly returns to its versatile condition. According to a D3O spokesman, the harder the impact, the better the shock absorption. D3O gives effect security and is obtainable in foam and TPR compositions.The back again of the hand is adorned with weighty-obligation TPR effect protection on the fingers and thumb, and up to the flexure of the wrist.Even with all this protecting material, finger dexterity and liberty of motion are equal to a conventional leather glove. The palm surfaces have exceptional grip, so hand and forearm exhaustion from holding the throttle and performing the levers is not an situation.Watson Gloves 025 Additional time The 025 Time beyond regulation glove is constructed with stretch mesh on the fingers, backhand, and wrist, making it a superior preference for riding in better temps. Air flow as a result of the back of the hand and finger surfaces is great. It is very relaxed, with nominal seam intrusion in the fingertips, down the fingers, and in the palm. Whilst the fingers are not appreciably pre-curved, the foundation substance is pliable ample to not seriously require it.

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2022 Honda CB500F Review (A Dozen Fast Facts: Urban Motorcycle)




There is something so satisfying about a motorcycle that fits like a well-worn glove, and that’s how the 2022 Honda CB500F matches up with my five-foot six-inch 115-pound body. It follows my movements effortlessly, never getting in the way of what I want to do or overwhelming me with its weight or power. As the naked bike in Honda’s mid-size lineup of 500 twins, the CB500F is most in its element as an urban motorcycle, handling commuting duties and around-town errands, while capably serving as a weekend sportbike in the canyons.Introduced in 2013 and updated every three years, the CB500F receives several functional improvements for 2022. The well-tweaked bike now has an inverted Showa SFF-BP fork, dual disc brakes up front, and has shed a few pounds. Already an approachable, easy-to-ride bike, these refinements further hone the CB500F as one of the best go-to bikes for a wide swath of riders.

  1. The CB500F has twin 296mm rotors upfront for 2022. Gone is the single 310mm disc and axial-mount caliper. They are replaced with smaller dual discs grasped by radially mounted four-piston Nissin calipers. Braking is linear and rewarding. There was never a time when I felt a lack of confidence in the brakes; the harder I squeezed the five-position adjustable lever, the quicker I slowed down. This allows an aggressive rider to extract the maximum performance out of the sensible 500F, while never catching a novice rider by surprise with a harsh initial bite. When riding more leisurely, the engine compression braking is often enough to slow you down. There’s a 240mm disc in the rear for finessing stops around town or aiding hard braking in the canyons. I’m a rear brake fan, and the feel at the pedal is spot-on. ABS is standard, non-intrusive, and always welcome.

  1. An inverted Showa SFF-BP fork appears on the 2022 Honda CB500F. Upgrading the conventional 41mm fork to Showa’s Separate Function Fork – Big Piston design gives the CB500F a firmer front end. There’s a spring in one tube and damping in the other, saving weight. No adjustments are available on the fork—not to worry, the action is well-dialed as-is. Plus, there’s plenty of feedback for the aggressive riders amongst you. The linkage-assisted shock is adjustable for spring preload should you take a passenger.
  1. Dropping four pounds from its curb weight, the CB500F weighs in at 416 pounds for 2022. While that still outweighs me 3.5x times over, it doesn’t feel like a handful. Even at parking-lot speeds—where you most feel a motorcycle’s weight—the 500F is easy to maneuver. It’s 16 pounds lighter than the closely related faired CBR500R, and weighs 23 pounds less than the CB500X adventure iteration. Coupled with the low seat height, it feels even lighter. These are pluses for less experienced riders, making the 500F that much more of a blast for the seasoned rider. Weight savings came from tweaks to the swingarm, radiator, and lighter wheels.

  1. Power delivery is smooth, supportive, and plenty
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2022 Honda CRF-E2 Review [15 Fast Facts: Electric Motorcycle Test]




The first electric motorcycle from Honda is here, and it might not be what you expected—the new 2022 Honda CRF-E2 is a trail bike for kids. The CRF-E2 is manufactured and designed by Greenger Powersports, with Honda helping with the setup of the final version. The result is described as a Honda Official Licensed Product, and we call it a Honda CRF-E2 because we’re a motorcycle publication. We grabbed one of the first E2s available from Greenger, and then let our youngest test rider loose on the local trails.2022 Honda CRF-E2 Review: Electric Motorcycle

  1. The 2022 Honda CRF-E2 is a quality motorcycle. The frame is a twin-spar aluminum design patterned after Honda’s adult motocrossers, disc brakes slow it down, Kenda Millville K771 tires put the electric power to the ground, and the E2 has a linkage-less cantilevered shock with adjustment for rebound damping and spring preload. The motorcycle looks great, and the finish is up to Honda standards. This isn’t a cheap toy you’ll find at hardware or department stores. It is sold exclusively at Honda dealers with a list price of $2950.
  1. The size of the CRF-E2 is midway between a Honda CRF50F and CRF110F. The E2’s seat is adjustable to a height of either 24.8 or 25.5 inches. In the low position, the seat is 3.2 inches higher than the CRF50F, and the high seat position is 0.4 inches lower than the CRF110F. Test rider Avery Bart is almost 8 years old, stands 4 feet 2 inches, and weighs 48 pounds, and the E2 fits her perfectly. Speaking of weight, at 106 pounds filled with electrons, the E2 is four pounds lighter than the CRF50F and a staggering 64 pounds lighter than the CRF110F—a huge difference for a young rider.

2022 Honda CRF-E2 Review: For Sale

  1. Operating the Honda CRF-E2 is incredibly easy. It has a keyed ignition. Once the key is in the switched to the on position, the rider or supervising adult can select one of two power modes. With the power mode engaged, push the on button (a repurposed e-start button), and all the rider has to do is twist the throttle. It’s instantly game-on, as the fully automatic one-speed transmission means no clutch or gear shifting. Any youngster of sufficient size who can balance a bicycle will be able to ride the E2.
  1. There is a significant difference between the two power modes. Stage 1 limits the speed of the E2 to 10 mph, while Stage 2 ups the ante to 20 mph. The 3.4 horsepower peak output is not nearly as important as the 18.4 ft-lbs of torque available. Without any doubt, the CRF-E2 is not underpowered.

2022 Honda CRF-E2 Review: Electric dirt bike

  1. Taking off from a standing start is not as smooth in Stage 1 as we’d like it to be. Electric motors on motorcycles are only as usable as the controller for the motor. With so much torque available as soon as an electric motor turns, it must be padded down for the power to be usable. In Stage 1, we found the power
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Affordable, easy to use and slick looking!

The Propella 7S electric bike is many things. It’s lightweight. It’s good looking. It’s affordable. The one thing it isn’t, is overly complicated. This e-bike is as simple as it gets and that is part of what makes it so attractive as a commuter e-bike.

If you remember our review of the Propella SS 4.0 last summer, you’ll already be familiar with the most important aspects of the Propella 7S.

The SS is simply the single-speed version of this bike, and otherwise is mostly identical.

While I enjoyed the SS as a great urban e-bike for flat cities, the 7S model adds a 7-speed transmission that is sure to be praised by commuters living in hillier areas and that want the ability to downshift for hill climbing or upshift for flat land speed.

You can check out my test riding of the Propella 7S in my succinct video review below. For an even more detailed analysis, though, keep reading afterwards for all of the details.

Propella 7S e-bike video review

Propella 7S tech specs

  • Motor: 250 W (400 W peak) Bafang rear geared hub motor
  • Top speed: 30 km/h (18.5 mph)
  • Range: 32-64 km (20-40 mi) depending on pedal assist level
  • Battery: 36V 7Ah (250 Wh)
  • Charge time: 2.5 hours
  • Weight: 16.8 kg (37 lb)
  • Frame: Aluminum alloy
  • Brakes: Shimano mechanical disc brakes
  • Tires: CST XPEDIUM 700C x 35
  • Extras: LCD display with speedometer, battery gauge, PAS level indicator, odometer, tripmeter, 5 speed settings, mounting points for racks/fenders, alloy bar ends, metal pedals, compact charger
  • Price: $1,249 (but sometimes on sale for $1,099)

Everything you need (almost), and nothing you don’t

When it comes to the Propella 7S, you have to go into this e-bike knowing what it’s for and what it isn’t for.

This is an urban-oriented e-bike, which means it is meant to be light and efficient. Tipping the scales at 37 lb (16.8 kg), it weighs significantly less than many other urban e-bikes we’ve seen.

It isn’t a powerhouse since it has a relatively small 250 watt motor, but it still puts out a peak of 400 watts to give you the extra power you need on acceleration or hill climbing.

But this isn’t some motorcycle in an e-bike’s clothing. This is the epitome of an electric bicycle designed for pedaling. It’s a Class 1 e-bike, meaning it lacks a throttle and operates only on pedal assist. You get five levels of pedal assist to choose from ranging from Level 1, where you’re doing most of the work, all the way up to Level 5, where you basically just have to lightly spin the pedals and let the motor do the work for you.

At full speed it will get you up to 18.5 mph, which might sound like an odd figure but is likely there because it translates to 30 km/h. I would have loved to see them give us that extra 1.5 mph allowable under Class 1 e-bike laws, as 20 mph would have

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