Pair of BOCES college students get $10k scholarships in auto tech level of competition

Two Batavia Career and Technical Education and learning (CTE) Middle Automobile Tech college students brought residence a extremely Major trophy on May 21!

Conner Gale from Byron-Bergen Central Schools, and Noah Burke from Batavia City Universities, took 1st place in the Ron Smith Memorial Automotive Level of competition that was held at Erie Community College or university and sponsored by Niagara Frontier Automotive Seller Association (NFADA).

Each individual pupil won a $10,000 school scholarship, as nicely as, a $5,000 resource scholarship.

Charlie Pfeil and Tom Hermann, representatives from NFADA, a short while ago paid out a visit to the Batavia CTE Middle to figure out these two students and also present them with their scholarship certificates.

Hermann discussed how noteworthy it was for these two significant faculty seniors to earn this competition.

“This is a really large offer for you to gain the levels of competition. In the past, the winners of the competitiveness have been persons who have graduated from substantial college and are utilized at dealerships,” Hermann said.  “This is a good accomplishment to set on your resume. The upcoming is yours.”

When requested about the levels of competition the two Connor and Noah explained that they ended up apprehensive.

“It was nerve-racking,” Noah said.  “We understood the duties that we experienced to finish but we weren’t confident of the particular issues we had to correct. But we labored collectively as a workforce.” (Just one of the responsibilities provided diagnosing and repairing an challenge with a auto that had been purposely bugged.)

Overall, equally students felt ready for the competitiveness.  “We expended time immediately after faculty planning and also invested a 7 days performing at Basil Ford in Buffalo so we could function on newer product motor vehicles,” Connor stated.  “The additional time that we put in preparing really paid off. Mr. Yates actually aided us to comprehend how to trouble fix,” Noah mentioned.

Bob Yates, Car Engineering Teacher, stated, “Conner and Noah represented Genesee Valley BOCES and my Automotive Technological innovation class in the most expert fashion. These two college students ended up so devoted and expended many hours getting ready for the level of competition,” Yates mentioned.  “This preparedness proved their achievements, and I’m so proud of Connor and Noah.”

The two Noah and Conner strategy to go after their instruction.  Conner is at present utilized at Livingston Associates and strategies to go to faculty for automotive engineering.  Noah programs to go to the State University of New York at Morrisville to analyze Automotive Administration.

Vincent Dickinson, a junior from Batavia City Educational institutions, positioned 2nd in the Ron Smith Memorial Automotive Level of competition Tire Rodeo.  This event is a timed event check of how a college student to thoroughly mounts, balances and, installs a tire.

Congratulations to Conner Gale, Noah Burke, and Vincent Dickinson.

 

Top rated picture: Margaret Poray, Govt Principal GV BOCES Batavia Campus Bob Yates, Vehicle Technology Teacher Noah Burke, Conner Gale, Charlie Pfeil and Tom Hermann, associates from NFADA.

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California car mandate would hit mechanics hard

In summary

Who loses and who gains as California cleans up its cars? Nearly 32,000 mechanics would lose jobs by 2040 under the proposed phaseout of new gas-powered cars. Electric companies would be the big winners.



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The pungent odor of motor oil and grease wafts through the air at JR Automotive in San Francisco as Jesus Rojas lifts the hood of a 2014 Honda Civic to inspect its engine. 

Gasoline-powered vehicles like this one have hundreds of moving parts and other components that keep mechanics like Rojas busy. Rojas, 42, has spent much of his life refining the specialized skills needed to inspect and repair them. 

But as California switches to electric vehicles in its battle against climate change and air pollution, these skills will be needed less and less over the next decade. By 2040, the state projects that nearly 32,000 auto mechanics jobs will be lost in California, since electric vehicles need far less maintenance and repair than conventional combustion engines.

“I’m not against electric vehicles,” said Rojas, who immigrated to the Bay Area from Mexico as a teenager and opened his own shop 11 years ago. “I’ve always loved cars and I’ll work on them until I can’t anymore. So we have to adjust. We have to get out of our comfort zones.”

In an effort to transform to a carbon-neutral, climate-friendly state, California’s proposal to phase out all new gas-powered cars by 2035 will drive a wide-ranging transition of the workforce.

Throughout the economy, an estimated 64,700 jobs will be lost because of the mandate, according to the California Air Resources Board’s calculations. On the other hand, an estimated 24,900 jobs would be gained in other sectors, so the estimated net loss is 39,800 jobs, a minimal amount across the state’s entire economy, by 2040.

But no single workforce in the state would be hurt more than auto mechanics: California has about 60,910 auto service technicians and mechanics, and more than half of those jobs would be lost over the next two decades if the mandate goes into effect, the air board calculates.

The transition would be phased in over a decade: Beginning with 2026 models, 35% of new cars and light-duty trucks sold in California would be zero-emission, reaching 51% in 2028, 68% in 2030 and 100% in 2035. The board will hold a hearing on June 9 before voting on the proposal in August. 

Alex Dirige, 67, an immigrant from Guam who has worked as a mechanic in San Francisco for more than 30 years, worries that the transition to electric cars will threaten the livelihoods of vulnerable groups like undocumented immigrants and cause many auto repair workers to leave the industry altogether.

The trade provides a steady and reliable income in California for many workers with no college degree. On average, mechanics across the state earn about $26 an hour or $54,190 a year, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

“Many mechanics who have

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